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Friday, April 24, 2020 | History

1 edition of Midrash Sifre on Numbers found in the catalog.

Midrash Sifre on Numbers

Midrash Sifre on Numbers

selections from early Rabbinic Scriptural interpretations

by

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Published by Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, Macmillan in London, New York .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. xxiii-xxiv.

Statementtranslated from the Hebrew, with brief annotations, and with special reference to the New Testament, by Paul P. Levertoff. With an introd. by G. H. Box.
SeriesTranslations of early documents. Ser. III. Rabbinic texts, Translations of early documents., Ser. III. Palestinian-Jewish and cognate texts (rabbinic)
ContributionsLevertoff, Paul P. b. 1878, tr.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBM517.S73 L4
The Physical Object
Paginationxxiv, 162 p.
Number of Pages162
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6711955M
LC Control Number28005689
OCLC/WorldCa2993442


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Midrash Sifre on Numbers Download PDF EPUB FB2

Midrash Sifre on Numbers - Selections from Rabbinic Scriptural Interpretations [Paul P. Levertoff] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Sifre to the Book of Numbers, is one of a group of halakic midrashim, or commentaries, largely concerned with the exposition of legal rulesAuthor: Paul P.

Levertoff. Genre/Form: Commentaries: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Sifrei. Numbers. English. Selections. Midrash Sifre on Numbers. London, Society for Promoting. : Comparative Midrash: Sifre to Numbers and Sifre Zutta to Numbers (Studies in Judaism) (): Neusner, Jacob: BooksFormat: Paperback.

Sifre: Sifre Numbers (interpretations of the Book of Numbers, were probably after ); Sifre Deuteronomy (interpretations of the book of Deuteronomy): Sifre (Aramaic " the books ") and Sifre dewe Raw (" books from the school Raws "), halachic (but large haggadic shares) Midrash to Numbers and Deuteronomy, probably out of school.

The purpose of this study is to identify the propositions of the principal Midrash-compilations of formative Judaism. Continuing with the theme of volume Seven, Midrash Sifre on Numbers book to Sifra, Jacob Neusner proceeds to Sifré to Numbers and Sifré to Deuteronomy. It is, further, to place these propositions, where established, into a relationship with those that characterize the canon as a whole.

Sifre on Numbers and Deuteronomy, going back mainly to the schools of the same two Rabbis. This work is mainly a halakhic midrash, yet includes a long haggadic piece in sections References in the Talmud, and in the later Geonic literature, indicate that the original core of Sifre was on the Book of Numbers, Exodus and Deuteronomy.

Genre/Form: Commentaries: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Sifrei. Numbers. English. Selections. Midrash Sifre on Numbers. London: A. Golub, The Sifre to the Book of Numbers, is one of a group of halakic midrashim, or commentaries, largely concerned with the exposition of legal rules, which form a group by themselves in Jewish Midrashic literature, and are of first-rate importance.

Talmud and Midrash - Talmud and Midrash - Talmudic and Midrashic literature: The Mishna is divided into six orders (sedarim), each order into tractates (massekhtot), and each tractate into chapters (peraqim).

The six orders are Zeraʿim, Moʿed, Nashim, Neziqin, Qodashim, and Ṭohorot. Zeraʿim (“Seeds”) consists of 11 tractates: Berakhot, Pea, Demai, Kilayim, Sheviʿit, Terumot. The largest free library of Jewish texts available to read online in Hebrew and English including Torah, Tanakh, Talmud, Mishnah, Midrash, commentaries and more.

Midrash Jonah is the midrash to the Book of Jonah, read on the Day of Atonement as hafṭarah during the Minḥah prayer, and containing a haggadic version of this prophetical book.

In Midrash Sifre on Numbers book editions the work consists of two parts; the Midrash Sifre on Numbers book part, in which the story of Jonah is allegorically referred to the soul, beginning with the words "Wa-yomer Adonai la-dag," is reprinted in Adolf Jellinek.

Numbers Rabbah (or Bamidbar Rabbah in Hebrew) is a religious text holy to classical is a midrash comprising a collection of ancient rabbinical homiletic interpretations of the book of Numbers (Bamidbar in Hebrew). In the first printed edition of the work of Constantinople (), it is called Bamidbar Sinai Rabbah, and so cited frequently by Nahmanides (–circa ) and others.

By Rabbi Dr. Azriel Rosenfeld “Midrash” is a summary of the non-Halachic material in the Talmud, based on the classical compilation “EIN YA’AKOV” The Torah not only contains legal principles (“Halachah”), but also teaches many other things from which we can derive important moral and philosophical lessons; this non-legal aspect of the Torah is called “Aggadah.” The “Written.

Sifre to Deuteronomy: This Sifre is as fragmentary in regard to the haggadah as Sifre to Numbers, and leads to the same conclusions arrived at regarding the latter midrash.

The haggadah constitutes about four-sevenths of the Sifre to Deuteronomy, and is divided into two groups, which include between them the halakic exposition.

Midrash. Here are entered general works on the Midrash. Works on the treatment of specific topics in the Midrash are entered under headings of the type topic in rabbinical literature, e.g. Brazen serpent in rabbinical literature.

See also what's at Wikipedia, your library, or elsewhere. Broader terms: Bible. Midrash Rabba or Midrash Rabbah can refer to part of or the collective whole of aggadic midrashim on the books of the Tanach, generally having the term "Rabbah" (רבה), meaning "great," as part of their midrashim are as follows.

Genesis Rabbah; Exodus Rabbah; Leviticus Rabbah; Numbers Rabbah; Deuteronomy Rabbah; Canticles Rabbah; Ruth Rabbah; Esther Rabbah. SIFRE ZUTA NUMBERS (szn) SIFRE ZUTA NUMBERS (szn) is a midrash halakhah of the school of R.

Aramaic word "zuta" means "small," paralleling the name "Sifre Rabbati [the large Sifre]" given to Sifrei Numbers (sn) by several of the Genizah remains of szn, however, do not attest to the limited scope of this midrash as compared to sn, and this name may possibly attest to its.

Sifre (Hebrew: סִפְרֵי; siphrēy, Sifre, Sifrei, also, Sifre debe Rab or Sifre Rabbah) refers to either of two works of Midrash halakha, or classical Jewish legal biblical exegesis, based on the biblical books of Numbers and Deuteronomy.

The Talmudic era Sifre. The title Sifre debe Rav (lit. "the books of the school of Rav") is used by Chananel ben Chushiel, Isaac Alfasi, and Rashi; it. Mechilta (Tractate) is a Midrash to Shemot (Exodus). Sifra (Book) is a Midrash to Vayikra (Leviticus).

Sifre (Books) is a Midrash to Bamidbar (Numbers) and Devarim (Deuteronomy). All three are mainly Halachic (having to do with Jewish Law). Different Midrashim are sometimes repeated in. Books shelved as midrash: The Red Tent by Anita Diamant, Sinners and the Sea: The Untold Story of Noah's Wife by Rebecca Kanner, Hebrew Myths: The Book o.

Numbers Rabbah (or Bamidbar Rabbah in Hebrew) is a religious text holy to classical is a midrash comprising a collection of ancient rabbinical homiletic interpretations of the book of Numbers (Bamidbar in Hebrew). In the first printed edition of the work of Constantinople (), [clarification needed] it is called Bamidbar Sinai Rabbah, and so cited frequently by Nahmanides ( ); Hammer’s edition for Sifre Deuteronomy: R.

Hammer (trans.), Sifre: A Tannaitic Commentary on the Book of Deuteronomy (New Haven: Yale University Press, ); and Levertoff’s edition for Sifre Numbers: P.P.

Levertoff (trans.), Midrash Sifre on Numbers: Selections from Early Rabbinic Scriptural Interpre-tations (New York: Macmillan Cited by: 1.

Sifre Bamidbar and Sifre Devarim are halakhic midrashim on Numbers and Deuteronomy, respectively. Sifre is also known as Sifrei de-Vei Rav. Sifre Zutta is an halakhic midrash on Bamidbar which exists only in fragmentary form. A critical edition of Sifrei Numbers was edited by H.

Horovitz: Siphre d'be Rab (Leipzig, ; 2nd ed. Jerusalem. Sifre. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better. What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia.

Just better. a book: a collection of midrash statements by an author(s), on a particular book of the Bible. There are many different midrash collections (e.g. Genesis Rabbah, Sifre Numbers, Mekhilta de Rabbi Ishmael, etc.) Each was written by a different authorship, for a different purpose.

Midrash Sifre on Numbers: selections from early Rabbinic Scriptural interpretations translated from the Hebrew, with brief annotations, and with special reference to the New Testament: Box, George Herbert (). Levertoff, Paul Philip (b. ): Books - or: Paul Philip (b.

) Box, George Herbert (). Levertoff. You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. The Sifre to Numbers is evidently a midrash which originated in R.

Simeon's school, and which has all the peculiarities and characteristics of such a work. It follows the same principles of exposition as does the Mekilta; the same group of tannaim appears. This omission has been supplied by Buber, in his very full edition of the Midrash Tehillim, by printing, under the superscription of the two psalms, collectanea from the Pesiḳ ta Rabbati, Sifre, Numbers Rabbah, and the Babylonian Talmud, so that the midrash in its present form covers the entire Book.

Methodology. When used as a verb, "midrash" refers to a way of interpreting a biblical verse. Traditionally, understanding of Biblical text in Judaism is divided between peshat (direct meaning), remez (hints), derash (exegesis) and sod (mystical).

The Midrash concentrates on remez but even more on derash. Many different exegetical methods are employed to derive deeper meaning from text. Standing at the conclusion of the book that follows, I can barely recall when and how it began. I first engaged, in a serious way, the Sifre's commentary on the Book of Deuteronomy during the academic year in a midrash text seminar taught byJudah Goldin at the University of Pennsylvania, where I was then a graduate focused our attention on the Sifre's commentary on the.

Tannaitic () exegetical midrash; two variations divided by the differing Rabbinic opinions to exegesis. Sifre Tannaitic () exegetical midrash; one existed for Leviticus, two existed for Numbers and one existed for Dueteronomy. The genre of Jewish literature known as Midrash has been poetically described as “the hammer that awakens the slumbering sparks on the anvil of the Bible.”The midrashic process utilizes a variety of methods, including expositions, explanations, gematria, plays on words, legends, and parables, to broaden our understanding of the full meaning of the biblical text.

Midrash Halakhah In Hebrew, halakhah refers to the law given in the Torah and the Mishnah. It includes the religious, ceremonial, and civil regulations.

The Midrash Halakhah, then, gives explanation to those laws. The Midrash Halakhah is divided into the Mehkilta on Exodus, the Sifra on Leviticus, and the Sifrei on Numbers and Deuteronomy. Sifre on Numbers and Deuteronomy, going back mainly to the schools of the same two Rabbis.

This work is mainly a halakhic midrash, yet includes a long haggadic piece in sections Sifre Zutta (The small Sifre).

This work is a halakhic commentary on the book of Numbers. MIDRASH RABBA. Several midrashim on books of the Bible. MIDRASHIC LITERATURE The midrashic method of exegesis presupposes a definitive and accepted scriptural text. In this way midrash differs essentially from the expansions and glosses that, in the course of their long period of formation, filled out the ancient books and occasionally gave them a new relevance for later times.

Source for information on Midrashic Literature: New Catholic. Scripture and Tradition is thus a sequel to Yadin-Israel's first book, Scripture as Logos: Rabbi Ishmael and the Origins of Midrash ().

That book, a systematic study of terminology and exegesis in the Ishmaelian midrashim, claimed that the school of Ishmael used scripture as a guide to interpreting scripture, continuing a tradition from the Qumran community.

The Paperback of the Amos in Talmud and Midrash: A Source Book by Jacob Neusner at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or more. Due to COVID, orders may be delayed. Thank you for your patience. Book Annex Membership Educators Gift Cards Stores & Events Help Auto Suggestions are available once you type at least 3 letters.

Author: Jacob Neusner. Schorsch quotes what he thinks is a tannaitic midrash, Sifre to Numbers. The passage deals with Moses’ Kushite wife (Numbers ), and is important for Schorsch’s purposes because it shows that at this early date “the term Kushite seem[s] to have already acquired fairly well-known.

Now, after having completed the preparations for the entire edition and the commentary for the first half of the work, comprising the portions of Naso and Beha`alotekha, I decided the time has come to publish is a Tannaitic midrash on the book of Numbers, and is rightfully considered to be one of the fundamental assets of our ancient.